Moro Blood Orange Vinegar

Moro Blood Orange Vinegar
Print Recipe
Depending on where you live, and your favorite grocery store, you may not be able to buy Moro blood oranges all year long. They come in season to brighten the winter months with their gorgeous color, luscious fragrance, and sweetness, but you can enjoy it for at least a little longer by making Moro blood orange vinegar. The end result is vividly fruity, with little of the vinegary taste remaining. You can use it to add a bold splash of taste to a wide variety of different dishes. • Add to salads alone, or as part of a vinaigrette; • Glaze a roast chicken or duck, or roast of pork; • Add it to martinis and other cocktails; • Splash it on plain baked chicken or fish just before serving; • Infuse the flavor into chicken, fish, or seafood by using it as a marinade; • Add a dash to wild rice or barley; • Drizzle it on a bowl of fresh fruit, plain pound cake, or ice cream.
Servings
2 cup
Servings
2 cup
Moro Blood Orange Vinegar
Print Recipe
Depending on where you live, and your favorite grocery store, you may not be able to buy Moro blood oranges all year long. They come in season to brighten the winter months with their gorgeous color, luscious fragrance, and sweetness, but you can enjoy it for at least a little longer by making Moro blood orange vinegar. The end result is vividly fruity, with little of the vinegary taste remaining. You can use it to add a bold splash of taste to a wide variety of different dishes. • Add to salads alone, or as part of a vinaigrette; • Glaze a roast chicken or duck, or roast of pork; • Add it to martinis and other cocktails; • Splash it on plain baked chicken or fish just before serving; • Infuse the flavor into chicken, fish, or seafood by using it as a marinade; • Add a dash to wild rice or barley; • Drizzle it on a bowl of fresh fruit, plain pound cake, or ice cream.
Servings
2 cup
Servings
2 cup
Ingredients
Servings: cup
Instructions
  1. Peel the Moro blood oranges with a sharp knife, cutting away only the peel and as much of the white pith as you can.
  2. Chop the flesh into chunks in a bowl, and discard any seeds.
  3. Transfer flesh and any juice into a food processor.
  4. Process until fully pureed.
  5. Pour the pureed oranges into a mesh sieve, and use a spoon to force the juice through. You’ll also get some of the pulp.
  6. You should end up with about 1 cup of very thick, pulpy Moro blood orange juice.
  7. Add the white wine vinegar, and stir together until well blended.
  8. Pour the mixture into a clean glass jar or bottle with a tight lid.
  9. Store in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.
  10. Shake before using.
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